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The History of
Bernards Township Street Names

Street Signs of Bernards Township

Finding a street today online is pretty easy. Go to google, type in the name and the town and voila, there's your street. But do you know WHAT stands behind the names of the Bernards Township street names? Now you can find out.

Here's one:
Henry Street was named after Parmenus C. Henry, where a nearby building was constructed around 1860 and was a general store for many years. In the late 1960s, Howard Brush removed the ‘false front’ and restored it to the original appearance with the gable end facing the street, known today as Brushes Deli. Now how about S. Finley?


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The complete file is also available for download in our archives section - Click Here


Name Street Justification
Aberdeen Place Named for early Scots settlers
Acken Road Named for the Acken family of Liberty Corner, landowners and shopkeepers
Addison Drive Named for Joseph Addison, English essayist and poet (1672-1719)
Alder Lane Named for a tree
Alexandria Way Named for William Alexander, Lord Stirling (1726-1783)
Allegheny Drive Named for a mountain range in the mid-east part of Appalachian Mountains
Allen Road Named for Josiah Allen of Liberty Corner, descendent of Ethan Allen, American soldier and patriot, 18th Century
Allen Street Named for W. J. Allen who owned much land in Basking Ridge Village in mid-19th Century
Alward Avenue Named for the Alward Family who settled on land here in 1732
Ambar Place Named for settlers in the area, early 20th Century
Amherst Drive Named for Baron Jeffrey Amherst, governor-general of British North America (1717-1797)
Annin Road Named for the John Annin family (Johnstons of Annandale, Scotland). Their 1,000 acres in 1722 were called Annin’s Corner and later renamed Liberty Corner
Appletree Lane Named for a tree
Arbor Circle Describes a feature of the area
Archgate Road Named to compliment companion English named streets in the area
Argyll Way Named for early Scots settlers
Arrowood Way Named for a tree
Ash Street Named for a tree
Ashwood Lane Named for a tree
Aspen Drive Named for a tree
Atlas Road Named for a collection of items bound together—such as streets in this area
Austin Drive Named for a family member of the developer
Autumn Drive Named for a family member of the developer
Baldwin Court Named for an old family of Liberty Corner, 19th Century
Balsam Way Named for a tree
Baltusrol Way Named for a golf course in Springfield, New Jersey
Barton Way Named for Clara Barton, founder of the American Red Cross (1821-1912)
Battalion Drive Named for a large squadron of soldiers, a ground force
Battle Hill Road Named for a site where two different forces met and fought, as in war or conflict
Bayberry Row Named for a tree
Beacon Crest Drive Named for location of Revolutionary Ware beacon, designed by Lord Stirling
Bedford Drive Named for a municipal borough and South Midland Town of Bedfordshire, England
Beech Street Named for a tree
Beechwood Road Named for a tree
Belle Grove Court Named for a beautiful wooded grove of trees and shrubs
Benedict Crescent Named for a family member of the developer
Berkeley Circle Named for John, Lord Berkeley, new proprietor of New Jersey, 1664
Bernard Drive Named for Sir Francis Bernards, provincial Governor of NJ 1758-1760
Berta Place Named for Roberta Headley, daughter of Harold Headley, land developer
Birch Drive Named for a tree
Blackburn Road Named for a city in northwest England
Bradford Lane Named for William Bradford, pilgrim settler and second governor of Plymouth Colony (1590-1657)
Brandeis Court Named for Louis Brandeis, U.S. writer, lawyer and jurist (1856-1941)
Brentwood Court Named for an urban district in Essex, England, Brentwood means “burnt wood”
Briar Lane Named for a prickly plant
Bridalwood Court Named for wood used to hold horse bridle accessories (bits, chains, buckles, rings, straps)
Brittany Place Named for a family member of the developer
Brook Avenue Describes a feature of the area
Brook Ridge Drive Describes a feature of the area
Brookfield Drive Describes a feature of the area
Brookside Avenue Describes a feature of the area
Brownlee Place Named for the Rev. William Brownlee, sixth pastor of the Basking Ridge Presbyterian Church. Street originally called Back Street (1783-1860)
Bullion Road Named for Bullion’s Tavern located in Liberty Corner during the American Revolution
Butternut Lane Named for a tree in the walnut family
Bryon Drive Named for Lord Byron (George Garden) English poet (1788-1834)
Caldwell Court Named for the Rev. James Caldwell (1734-1781) “fighting person” of the American Revolution
Cameron Court Named for early Scots settlers
Cannon Court Named for mounted gun used in the Revolutionary War
Canoe Brook Lane Named for a golf course in Summit, New Jersey
Canter Drive Describes an easy gallop, at a pace of Canterbury pilgrimage
Carlisle Road Named for early Scots settlers
Carnegie Place Named for early Scots settlers
Carriage Way Named for a pleasant road to travel
Carswell Court Named for the Carswell family, active in township community affairs since the 20th Century
Carteret Trail Named for Sir George Carteret, new proprietor of New Jersey, 1664
Castle Way Describes new homes being constructed in Meadowview Estates, 1958
Cayuga Way Named for North American Indians, the smallest tribe of the Iroquois Confederacy
Cedar Creek Drive Describes a feature of the area
Cedar Street Named for a tree
Chapin Lane Named for original estate of Chapin-Earhart family
Charleston Court Named for Charleston, South Carolina, first historic district in the US
Charter Court Named for the Charter created by King George II, honoring Sir Francis Bernard—Bernardston Township, on May 20, 1760
Cherry Lane Named for a tree
Chestnut Court Named for a tree
Childs Road Named for William Childs, who moved the barn to the Old Mill Inn site and Samuel Childs, benefactor to the Bernards Township Library in the 1900’s
Chimney Ash Farm Road Named for the old Alward Homestead, known as Chimney Ash Farm, in the 19th Century
Church Street Named for the road where the Liberty Corner Presbyterian Church is located
Clark Court Named for Abraham Clark, a NJ signer of the Declaration of Independence, 1776
Clive Lane Named for Robert Clive, British general and statesman in India (1725-1774)
Cobble Lane Describes a feature of the area
Coddington Court Named for early settlers in the West Millington area of the township
Collyer Lane Named for John Collyer family, large land owners on south maple Avenue, 19th Century
Colonial Drive Named for a person who supported America’s fight during the Revolutionary War
Colts Glen Lane Describes a feature of the area
Columbia Road Named for poetic name of United States of America
Commonwealth Dr. Named for any group of persons united by a common interest
Compton Court Named for James Compton’s family farm in Liberty Corner area in the 18th Century
Concord Lane Named for the second battle of the American Revolution, Concord, MA, April 19, 1775
Conkling Street Named for the Conkling family, 19th Century settlers in Bernards
Constitution Way Named for the fundamental law of the US, framed in 1787
Continental Lane Refers to an American soldier in the Revolutionary War
Cooper Lane Named for early settlers in the township
Coppergate Drive Named for Coppergate Farm, a large dairy operation on the west side of Lyons road in the 1900’s
Cottage Avenue Describes a feature of the area
Country Lane Describes a feature of the area
Countryside Drive Describes a feature of the area
Courter Street Named for the old Courter Farm, on the north side of West Oak Street, between the Brook and Mount Airy Road, 19th Century
Crabtree Court Named for a tree
Craig Street Named for Daniel D. Craig, banker and storekeeper, 19th Century
Crest Drive Describes a feature of the area
Cross Road Named for the Rev. John Cross, first pastor of the Basking Ridge Presbyterian Church
Crown Court Drive Named for the entire Crown Court development
Culberson Road Named for the Culberson family, landowners for more than 150 years. The street runs through their property
Darren Drive Named for a family member of the developer
Dawn Drive Named for a family member of the developer
Dayton Street Named for William L. Dayton (1807-1864), U.S. Senator, Vice Presidential candidate and Ambassador to France
Debra Lane Named for daughter of developer, Jerry Petracura
Decker Street Named for early settlers in the township. Carl G. Decker sold to Wheeler Corporation in 1939 this tract known as the Bernards Plateau.
Deer Creek Drive Describes a feature of the area
Deer Ridge Road Describes a feature of the area. Name of development
Deerfield Court Describes a feature of the area
Depot Place Named for the area around the Basking Ridge Railroad Station
Devon Court Named for the early English settlers
Dexter Drive Named for a family member of the developer
Dickinson Road Named for John Dickinson (1732-1808), a signer of the US Constitution from Delaware
Doggett Court Named after the President of the High Meadow Hunt Club
Dogwood Way Named for a tree
Dorchester Drive Named for a town in the County of Dorsetshire, England
Douglas Road Named for the Douglas family who settled this area in 1765
Drury Lane Named for a street in London, England, famous for its theaters
Dryden Road Named for John Dryden (1631-1700) English poet, dramatist and critic
Dyckman Place Named for the Rev. W. H. Dyckman, who preached in both the Basking Ridge and Methodist Churches, 19th Century
Edward Court Named for a family member of the developer
Elizabeth Street Named for a family member of the developer
Ellis Drive Named for Monroe F. Ellis, for whom Monroe Place was also named in 1900’s
Elmwood Court Named for a tree
Emily Road Named for Emily Dickinson (1830-1886), American poet
English Place Named for the Rev. James English (1810-1873), first pastor of the Liberty Corner Presbyterian Church
Eton Place Names for a town in southern England on the Thames
Evergreen Place Named for a plant
Everson Place Named for original family on property before development in late 1900’s
Fairbanks Lane Named for Charles W. Fairbanks (1852-1918), political leader and vice president of the US
Fairview Drive Describes a feature of the area
Fawn Lane Describes a feature of the area
Federal Drive Named for a strong central government
Fellowship Road Named for Fellowship Village and area adjacent—Fellowship Deaconry
Fieldstone Drive Describes a feature of the area
Fieldview Drive Describes a feature of the area
Fife Lane Named for a type of flute used in military musical groups
Finley Avenue Named for the Rev. Robert Finley (1772-1817), fifth pastor of the Basking Ridge Presbyterian Church and builder of the 1809 Brick Academy
Firethorne Trail Named for a shrub
Flintlock Court Named for a firearm used in the American Revolution
Forbes Court Named for Dr. John Forbes, local physician, c1900’s
Forest Trail Describes a feature of the area
Franklin Drive Named in honor of Benjamin Franklin, American statesman and philosopher (1706-1790)
Frederick Court Named for a family member of the developer
Galloping Hill Road Describes a feature of the area
Gatehouse Drive Describes a feature of the area
Gelsey Lane Named for a family member of the developer
Georgetown Court Named in honor of George II (16873-1760) who granted the Bernards Township Charter on May 24, 1760
Georgian Court Named for that period of British history from George I in 1714 to George IV in 1830
Gerard Avenue Named for son of builder, Jerry Petracura
Glen Avenue Describes a feature of the area
Gold Boulevard Named for a family member of the builder
Goltra Drive Named for James P. Goltra (1792-1871), farmer, judge and builder of the Liberty Corner Presbyterian Church
Gordon Place Named for early Scots settlers
Governor Drive Named for Sir Francis Bernards (1712-1779), NJ Provincial Governor, 1758-1760
Granville Way Named for John Carteret, The Earl of Granville, (1690-1763) British statesman and orator
Green Mountain Dr. Named for the Green Mountain Boys, soldiers form Vermont, organized by Ethan Allen in 1775
Grist Mill Drive Named for one of Bernards Township 16 mills of long ago
Grove Road Named for fruit orchards of Cedar Hill Farm
Haas Road Named for John V. Haas, farmer and owner of Sunnyside Farm in West Millington area
Hackleberry Square Named for unusual shrub
Hadley Court Named for Henry K. Hadley (1871-1937) U.S. composer and conductor
Hale Court Named for Nathan Hale (1755-1776), American soldier hanged as a spy by the British during the American Revolution
Hamilton Road Named for Alexander Hamilton (1755-1804) American statesman and first U.S. Secretary of the Treasury
Hampton Court Named for Henry VIII’s palace in England
Hancock Court Named for John Hancock (1737-1793) first signer of the Declaration of Independence, 1776
Hansom Road Named for a popular horse drawn vehicle
Harcourt Lane Named for Col. William Harcourt, arresting British officer of General Charles Lee at the Widow White’s Tavern, Basking Ridge, 12/13/76
Hardscrabble Road Named for an area difficult to produce goods or crops—providing meagerly returns for much effort
Harrison Brook Dr. Named for John Harrison, agent of the King of England, who bought 3000 acres of land for $50 from the Lenai Lenape Indians in 1717
Hartley Lane Named for David Hartley (1705-1757), English physician and philosopher
Hawthorne Place Named for a shrub
Heath Drive Named for 18th Century English settlers
Heather Lane Named for a shrub
Hemlock Place Named for a tree
Henry Street Named for Parmenus C. Henry, owner of P.C. Henry’s General Store and other properties in the area, 19th Century
Hessian Street Named for a mercenary used by England during the American Revolution
Hickory Drive Named for a tree
High Meadow Lane Describes a feature of the area
Highland Avenue Describes a feature of the area
High Meadow Ave. Describes a feature of the area
Hillcrest Way Describes a feature of the area
Hillside Terrace Describes a feature of the area
Hill Top Road Describes a feature of the area
Holmesbrook Road Names for Thomas Holmes who arrived from England in 1831
Homeland Avenue Named for one of the first housing developments in the township
Homestead Road Names for the Homestead Village development
Honeyman Road Named for John Honeyman (1727-1822) who was a spy for George Washington prior to the Battle of Trenton, 1776
Hopkinson Court Named for Francis Hopkinson (1737-1791) N.J. signer of the Declaration of Independence, 1776
Hudson Drive Named for Henry Hudson. English navigator and explorer
Hunters Lane Named for the past use of the area
Huntington Road Named for Samuel Huntington (1731-1797) American Revolution political leader
Independence Drive Named for freedom not under any control
Irving Place Named for Isaac L. Irving family of Liberty Corner—former mortician, wheelwright and blacksmith, 19th Century
Ivy Lane Named for a plant
Jamestown Road Named for the first permanent English settlement in North American 1607
Jeffrey Court Named for son of builder, Jerry Petracura
Joanna Court Named for a family member of the developer
Johnston Circle Named for Johnston family who left Annandale, Scotland and arrived in 1722 in area known today as Liberty Corner
Juniper Way Named for a tree
Keats Road Named for John Keats (1795-1921) English poet
Kensington Road Named for a Borough of West London, England
Kindred Court Named for the Cocuzza family group, building houses together on same road
King George Road Named for King George II who granted charter creating Bernards Township on May 24, 1760
Kinnan Way Named for Mary Lewis Kinnan (1764-1848) captive of the Indians, rescued and returned to Basking Ridge, 1794
Knollcroft Road Named for estate of Walter Reynolds, most of property now occupied by U.S. Veterans Medical Center, Lyons
Knox Court Named for General Henry Knox (1750-1806) of Washington’s staff in the American Revolution
Lafayette Lane Named for Marquis deLafayette, friend of General George Washington (1757-1834) French general and statesman
Lake Road Describes a feature of the area. Was originally a lake area and filled in
Lakeside Slope Describes a feature of the area
Landau Road Named for Landau, German, where a popular convertible carriage was made, 18th Century
Launcelot Lane Named for a legendary knight in English literature
Layton Road Named for Peter Layton of Liberty Corner, former mortician, wheelwright and blacksmith, 19th Century
Lee Place Named for General Charles Lee (1731-1782) arrested by the British in Basking Ridge, December 13, 1776
Lenape Court Named for “original people” Lenai Lenape Indians, a branch of the Delawares—part of the Algonquin nation
Lewis Street Named for the Edward Lewis family who arrived in the mid 18th Century and contributed to many township activities since 1730’s
Lexington Road Named for the first battle of the American Revolution at Lexington, 1775
Liberty Corner Road Named for thoroughfare in the township, traveling same route as Martinsville Road
Liberty Ridge Road Named to combine names of two Bernards Township villages—Liberty Corner and Basking Ridge
Lincroft Drive Scots name for a small garden area
Lindbergh Lane Named for Col. Charles Lindbergh (1902-1974) who flew the Atlantic solo in 1927. Prior name was School Street
Linden Drive Named for a tree
Locust Lane Named for a tree
Lone Oak Road Describes a feature of the area
Long Road Describes a feature of the area
Long Rifle Lane Named for a shoulder firearm used in the American Revolution
Lord Stirling Road Named for Lord Stirling, William Alexander (1726-1783), major general in the continental Army whose estate “Stirling Manor” was built here in 1762
Lurline Drive Named for Lurline Eberkardt, accidentally shot while hunting
Lyons Place Named for David Lyons family here in lat 18tuh Century. Family owner land where Lyons Railroad Station is located and had encouraged Bernards to bring first railroad to area in 1872.
Lyons Road Named for David Lyons family here in the late 18th Century. Family owned land where Lyons Railroad Station is located and had encouraged Bernards to bring first railroad to area in 1872.
Madisonville Road Named in honor of U.S. President James Madison (1751-1836)
Magnolia Path Named for a tree
Manchester Drive Named for a city in Southeast Lancashire, northwest England
Manor Drive Named for Manor House 7 Walter Reynolds estate “Knollcroft”. Much of area now occupied by U.S. Veterans Medical Center, Lyons
Maple Ave. North & South Named for a very large maple tree in area
Maple Run Named for a large maple tree in area
Marilyn Street Named for daughter of builder, Jerry Petracura
Marlborough Court Named for John Churchill (1650-1722) first Duke of Marlborough, British Military Commander
Martinsville Road Named for a thoroughfare in the Township which terminates in Martinsville (Bridgewater). Named for prominent Martin family
Mayflower Drive Named for the ship in which the Pilgrim Fathers sailed from Southampton, England to the New World, 1620
Meadowview Road Describes a feature of this area. Named for Meadowview Estates
Meeker Road Named for the Meeker family which had large land holdings since the mid 19th Century
Melbourne Way Named for William Lamb, Second Viscount Melbourne (1779-1848) English statesman and prime minister
Merchant Court Named for an occupation of the early settlers, involved in trade and commerce
Milito Way Named for the Milito family who occupied land and have lived there since the late 1800’s
Mine Brook Road Named for very old geographic location in Bernards which also describes a feature of the area
Minuteman Court Named for an American militia man just before and after the Revolutionary War, who was ready for instant military service
Monarch Circle Named for the entire Monarch Circle development
Monroe Place Named for Monroe F. Ellis for whom Ellis Drive was also named in 1900’s
Morgan Lane Named for the early Scots settlers
Morrison Avenue Named for early settlers in the Township
Morristown Road Named for the rad leading from Bernards Township to Morristown (known today as Route 202)
Mount Airy Road Named by Ezra Dayton, owner of Mount Airy Nurseries on Pill Hill Road, late 19th Century
Mount Prospect Rd Named for very old geographic area from Revolutionary War times
Mountain Road Describes a feature of the area
Musket Drive Named for a large heavy caliber handgun used in the Revolutionary War
Nancy Lane Named for a family member of the developer
Newell Drive Named for William A. Newell (1817-1901), N.J. Governor
Normandy Court Named for a region in northern France along the English Channel
Oak Ridge Road Describes a feature of the area
Oak Street, East & West
(formerly Oak Stump Road)
Named for the beloved 600 year old Oak Tree in the Basking Ridge Presbyterian Churchyard. Was also once known as Oak Stump Road down near the western end.
Oakhill Drive Describes a feature of the area
Oakley Street Named for an early family which settled in the area
Oakmont Lane Named for a golf course in Oakmount, PA
Old Army Road Named for the road Colonial soldiers marched en route to the Vealtown Tavern, Bernardsville
Old Coach Road Named for old travel route through the Township
Old Farm Road Describes a feature of the area
Old Stage Coach Rd Named for old travel route through the Township
Olde Madisonville Rd Named for original route through Coffee House Corners
Orchard Place Describes a feature of the area
Osborne Place Named for J.H. Osborne’s sawmill and pond
Overlook Avenue Describes a feature of the area
Owens Court Named for Wolf Owens, owner of land and developer
Ox Bow Lane Named for the oxbowed shape of the land
Pacer Court Named for the development, Pacer Estates
Paddock Court Named for the paddock area of Coppergate Horse Stables
Paine Court Named for Thomas Paine (1737-1809), patriot and writer, the “Conscience of the American Revolution”
Paisley Lane Named for early Scots settlers
Palmerston Place Named for Henry J. Temple, Third Viscount Palmerston (1784-1865) British statesman and prime minister
Parkview Avenue Describes a feature of the area
Parkwood Lane Describes a feature of the area
Patriot Hill Drive Named for a person who loves, supports and defends his Country and its interests with devotion
Peachtree Road Named for the peach orchids on Cedar Hill Farm
Pennington Street Named for Dr. William Pennington, country physician
Penns Way Named for William Penn (1644-1718), who purchased land from the Indians, west of Harrison’s Brook, including Liberty Corner
Penwood Road Named for William Penn (1644-1718), who purchased land from the Indians, west of Harrison’s Brook, including Liberty Corner
Pheasant Run Dr. Describes a feature of the area
Pin Oak Court Named for a tree
Pine Street Named for a tree
Pine Valley Court Named for a golf course in Pine Valley, N.J.
Pitney Court Named for James Pitney, first recorded settler in this area, early 18th Century
Plymouth Court Named for the oldest town in New England, founded by the Pilgrims, 1620
Pond Hill Road Describes a feature of the area
Post Terrace Named for route of the mail express, 19th Century
Potomac Drive Named for a Historic River in the Virginia-Washington, D.C. area
Prescott Court Named for William Prescott (1726-1795), U.S. soldier, played vital part in Battle of Bunker Hill, 1775. “Don’t fire till you see the whites of their eyes” – famous order given in Battle
Primrose Lane Named for a flower
Princeton Court Named for the Battle of Princeton, American Revolutionary War, 1777
Privet Way Named for a plant
Prospect Avenue Describes a feature of the area and an extensive view
Quail Court Describes a feature of the area
Queen Anne Drive Named for the reigning queen of England in the early 18th Century (1665-1714)
Queenberry Way Named for a hill in Scotland in honor of the Scots Royal House of Douglas
Quincy Road Named for Susan Morton Quincy (1764-1850), who wrote her recollections of Basking Ridge during and after the American Revolution
Rachel Court Named for a family member of the developer
Radel Place Named for a 19th Century farming family
Raleigh Court Named for Sir Walter Raleigh (1552-1618), English Explorer, writer and favorite of Elizabeth I
Ramapo Drive Named for a mountain range in the NJ-NY border, part of the Highlands. Name means streams or ponds one after another
Rankin Avenue Named for the Rev. John C. Rankin, tenth pastor of the Basking Ridge Presbyterian Church
Raritan Place Named for a branch of Lenni Lenape Indians who inhabited New Jersey. The name means “stream overflows”
Regent Circle Named for a person who rules in a kingdom when the true successor cannot serve because of disability, minority or absence
Revere Road Named for Paul Revere (1735-1818), American patriot and silversmith, famous for his night horseback ride, April 18, 1775
Richmond Drive Named for a city in north Surrey, England, site of KEW Gardens
Rickey Lane Named for Col. Israel Rickey (1744-1821), a valuable officer in the Revolutionary War
Ridge Street Named for a thoroughfare in Basking Ridge village
Ridgeview Drive Describes a feature of the area
Riggs Court The Riggs family settled in the area in the early 1800’s
Riverside Drive Describes a feature of the area
Roberts Circle Named for a family member of the developer
Rocky Lane Describes a feature of the area
Roe Lane Describes a feature of the area
Rose Court Named for a flower
Rosemont Court Named for an ante-bellum estate in southern USA
Ross Lane Named for Betsy Ross (1752-1836), maker of the first 13-star American flag
Royal Oak Drive Named for a tree
Runyon Court Named for early settlers in the West Millington area
St. Nickolas Way Named for a 4th Century Christian Prelate
Salem Street Named for Salem County, NJ, oldest English settlement in the State, founded by the Quakers
Savannah Court Named for a grassland region with scattered trees and open plains or woodland
Schindler Drive Named for Oskar Schindler (1900-1974), German industrialist who saved Jews from Nazi execution during World War II
Scotsmans Way Named in honor of the Annin family, known as Johnston in Scotland. Settled Liberty Corner area in 1722
Sentry Court Named for a member o a guard or a watch, a sentinel
Sentinel Drive Named for a soldier stationed as a guard to challenge all comers and prevent a surprise attack
Sentry Court Named for a member of a guard or a watch, a sentinel
Shadowbrook Lane Describes a feature of the area
Shannon Hill Road Named for existing farm in area for more than a Century
Shawnee Court Named for a sub-tribe of the Algonquin Indians
Shepard Way Named for Alan B. Shepard, Jr., US astronaut
Sherwood Drive Named for an ancient royal forest in England
Signal Point Road Named for an universal, notable outstanding area
Sleepy Hollow Road Describes a feature of the area
Smithfield Court Named for an agricultural region in southern England
Smoke Rise Road Describes a feature of the area
Somerville Road Named for the Duke of Somerset, who received his title after the Battle of Somerset, 1658
Southard Place Named for the Southards, Father Henry (1747-1842), US Representative; Sen. Samuel L. (1787-1842), US Senator, NJ Governor, Secretary of the Navy
Spencer Road Named for Austin P. Spencer, lost at sea in the North Atlantic while piloting a bomber on submarine duty, 1943
Springfield Lane Describes a feature of the area
Spring House Lane Describes a feature of the area
Spring Valley Blvd. Describes a feature of the area
Spruce Street Named for a tree
Stacy Lane Named for a family member of the developer
Stafford Lane Named for a city and the County seat of Staffordshire, in Central England
Stirling Lane Named for Lord Stirling, William Alexander (1726-1783), American Revolutionary War major general
Stockmar Drive Named for Baron von Stockmar, Christian Friedrich (1787-1863) English-Belgium statesman
Stone Creek Lane Describes a feature of the area
Stone Hedge Drive North/South Describes a feature of the area
Stone Ridge Lane Describes a feature of the area
Stonehouse Road Named for the Stone House @ its corner, built in 1764, one of three stone houses built in Bernards before the Revolutionary War
Stoneview Court Describes a feature of the area
Stonybrook Road Describes a feature of the area
Sullivan Drive Named for General John Sullivan (1740-1795), Revolutionary War leader
Summit Drive Describes a feature of the area, name of development
Sun Drive Describes a feature of the area
Sunnybrook Road Describes a feature of the area
Sunset Lane Describes a feature of the area
Surrey Lane Named for a county in southeast England, bordering south of London
Sutro Place Named for the Sutro family which owned property on South Finley Avenue. Son Frederick (1879-1964) was executive director of NJ Park Commission
Sycamore Court Named for a tree
Talmadge Lane Named for a family member of the developer
Tamarisk Court Named for a small Mediterranean tree
Tanglewood Lane Describes a feature of the area
Tartan Drive Named for early Scots settlers
Thackeray Drive Named for William Makepeace Thackeray (1811-1863), English novelist
Thomson Way Named for Harold Thomson, former mayor and township committee member 1948 -1956
Townshend Road Named for Charles Townshend (1725-1767), English statesman and sponsor of act which placed duties on commodities imported to the colonies
Trinity Drive Named for Trinity College, Oxford, England
Tulip Lane Named for a flower
Turner Street Named for Kenneth A. Turner Sr., Bernards Township Engineer, 1932-1957
Tuxford Terrace Named for a area outside London, England
Tysley Street Named for early settlers in the Township. Tysley Avenue is in Bernardsville
Vail Terrace Named for Daniel Vail (1735-1793), large land owner & distant cousins of Alfred Vail, who with Samuel F. B. Morse invented the telegraph @Speedwell, Morristown, 1844
Valley Road Describes a feature of the area
Valley View Drive Describes a feature of the area
Van Dorn Road Named for Ferdinand Van Dorn (1807-1902), who owned and operated the flour/grist mill in Franklin Corners
Van Holten Road Named for a family member of the developer
Vanderveer Drive Named for Dr. James Vanderveer (1838-1913), country doctor
Victoria Drive Named for English settlers of the 19th Century
Village Drive Describes a feature of the area
Voorhees Drive &Voorhees Dr. North Named for Dr. Amadee Voorhees, country doctor in the mid-19th Century
Walnut Circle Named for a tree
Warwick Lane Named for a town in and the county seat of Warwickshire in Central England; also, a castle
Washington Avenue Named to honor President George Washington (1732-1799)
Watchung Drive Named for a branch of the Lenni Lenape Indians who inhabited NJ. The name means “mountain place”
Wayne Terrace Named for General “Mad Anthony” Wayne (1745-1796), American Revolutionary War leader
Wedgewood Drive Named for ceramic ware made by Josiah Wedgewood (1730-1795), English potter
Wellington Drive Named for the Duke of Wellington (1769-1852), known as Arthur Wellesly and “Iron Duke”, British general, statesman and prime minister
Wexford Way Named for a county in the southeast Republic of Ireland
Wharton Way Named for Edith Wharton (1862-1937), American novelist
Whitenack Road Named for the Whitenack family which settled here in the mid-18th Century and were large landowners
Whitetail Lane Describes a feature of the area
Whittingham Road Named for a thoroughfare in London, England
Wildwood Drive Name means a wood growing in the wild – a forest
William Street Named for a family member of the developer
Willow Street Named for a tree
Winding Lane Describes a feature of the area
Windsor Way Named for Windsor Castle, site of residence
Witherspoon Lane Named for Dr. John Witherspoon (1723-1794), patriot, NJ signer of the Declaration of Independence and president of Princeton University
Wolf Lane Named for Lyla Wolf Florio’s maiden name, property owner
Woodman Lane Named for a forester, dealer of wood, lumberman
Woods End Describes a feature of the area
Woodstone Road Describes a feature of the area
Woodward Lane Named for Woodward family which supplied grain and material to the Revolutionary War troops at Jockey Hollow
Yorkshire Court Named for the family seat of Sir Francis Bernard (1712-1779) in England

 

 

 

Thanks to June Kennedy, the Bernards Township historian who's researched the history of the streets, and is also the person the township looks to when naming new streets through out Bernards Twp.

 


 


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About The Brick Academy

BR_Brick_Academy_Sketch_08_sm.jpgThe Brick Academy (also known as the Basking Ridge Classical Schoolhouse) is a 1809 Federal-style architectural structure located in the center of Basking Ridge in Bernards Township. The Brick Academy has been a boys’ private preparatory school, a public school, a meeting hall for several fraternal and benevolent organizations, and the Bernards Township municipal building. It currently serves as the headquarters of The Historical Society of the Somerset Hills, as well as a schoolhouse and museum to local history. The Brick Academy also celebrated its bicentennial in 2009.

 

About the Historical Society of the Somerset Hills (THSSH)

Founded in 1928 originally as the Historical Society of Basking Ridge, the mission and name of the society was later changed to The Historical Society of the Somerset Hills, a 501 (c) (3) non-profit organization including all five communities of the Somerset Hills region: Bedminster Township, Bernards Township, Bernardsville ,Far Hills, Peapack-Gladstone which are all located in Somerset County, New Jersey.

The mission of The Historical Society of the Somerset Hills (THSSH) is to acquire, conserve and share local artifacts and information on matters of local historic interest; cultivate interest in local history; encourage the preservation of local historic resources; facilitate historic research; and preserve, operate, and interpret the Brick Academy.

To further this mission, THSSH sponsors events and activities that promote community awareness and appreciation of the history and architecture of the Somerset Hills. THSSH headquarters is at the Brick Academy in the Basking Ridge section of Bernards Township, where our collections of items of local historic interest are available to the public.

 

 

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